3 Free Ways to Encourage Your Husband 


When I started thinking of Valentine’s Day and how I could show my husband my appreciation for him (for free of course), I came up with – what I thought was – a pretty good list!! Writing notes, being his cheerleader, keeping our home clean… (I’m hearing Olaf saying, “All good things, all good things!”) However, when I asked my husband about this, his list was totally different from what I thought it would be (glad I asked!).

These may not be just right for every man, but here’s what my husband said:

  • Make it clear you’re on his side. Whether he knows it’s happening or not, whether you realize it or not, be on his side. He should always know that you have his best interest at heart. My husband gives the example of a lady who had her husband’s car and needed to park it in the church parking lot. With kids and stuff to take inside and being pressed for time, she was tempted to park in a handicapped spot. However, because she was in her husband’s car and knew her husband would not appreciate that, she decided against that and found another spot, though it was less convenient.
  • Figure out what he likes or appreciates, and do it better than he would. Not in a competitive way. In a “I did my research; you didn’t even know I was thinking about it” kind of way. Exceed his expectations. If he appreciates food (most guys do, right?), make it better than normal, add nice linens, candles, etc. (My husband would appreciate the details more than the meal!) If he appreciates a particular sports team, have his favorite snacks ready for that game. Not hard, yet impressive.
  • Let his standard be your standard. Not gonna lie, this is not an easy one for me. Because my husband is, in a word, particular. And don’t get me wrong: I love his attention to detail. But I love it more when he’s the one taking the time for details. But from experience I’ve learned that our relationship is so much better, he feels much more respected (which to him is better than feeling loved) when I just adapt.

If nothing else, this gives you a starting point to ask your husband if these work for him or if he would have something to change or add to it. (I would love to know if he adds “write me notes” or “have the house clean when I come home” :).

Happy encouraging!

Buying and Selling Clothes Online 

TLDR (Too Long; Didn’t Read): If you have extra time and clothing and want to make some extra cash, check out Poshmark! (See end of post for free $5 off!)

If you’re on a budget, purging and shopping might not be words you enjoy hearing. If you’re tight on money and do some purging, what happens if you get rid of it but find out later you need it? And shopping for new clothes? Remember the word budget? Yeah. I get it. I’ll suffice it to say that if you’re not using it, why not try to make a few dollars selling it online? And in doing so, you might find something you want to spend your earnings on, so then you’re basically trading, not buying or spending!

Here are my opinions of selling and buying clothes online using a couple of the most popular clothing resale and retail apps.

Poshmark

Pros for selling on Poshmark: 

You can market your closet as much as you’d like! (Sharing others’ closets usually yields to others sharing your closet which betters your chance of sales).

You can cash out promptly with no minimum.

You can do direct deposit or request a check.

The system automatically bundles your items and discounts the price according to your discount choice.

They have customer service personnel so you don’t have to deal with unsatisfied customers directly.

You get paid on time, as long as the customer is satisfied (otherwise your clothing will be returned to you). No waiting and wondering if the buyer will mark your item received.

Total earnings via Poshmark in 12 months: $307
Cons for selling on Poshmark:

Poshmark takes out 20% of your earnings if the price of your item is $15 or more and takes out $2.95 for items under $15.

The buyer is charged $6.50 for shipping, so it’s harder to sell a $5 shirt (in which you make $2!), because the buyer actually has to pay $11.50.

It can be somewhat time-consuming trying to share your clothes and others’ clothes in order to make a sale.

It can take some serious deals, cute clothes, and a decent amount of time to get some good headway in making money.

Poshmark pros for buying:

The filters are user-friendly.

You can shop your liked items.

You get notifications when a liked item has dropped in price.

You can negotiate the price with the seller, using the offer button.

You can find some awesome deals if people are just trying to get rid of their stuff!

You can return the item and get your money back if the item does not meet the description.

Cons for buying on Poshmark: 

As stated above, there’s a $6.50 shipping fee no matter what item you buy. The price goes up if it’s 5 lbs or more.

Sellers are not required to state if they have pets or if they smoke. It’s up to you to ask.

Of course, as with any online shopping, nothing beats trying on an item for yourself before purchasing!

Mercari

I don’t have as much to say about Mercari because… well it’s Mercari.

Pros for selling on Mercari:

You can sell just about anything, not just clothes.

They take out 10% of what you make, which is better than Poshmark in many cases.

You choose whether or not you, the seller, pay for shipping. This could get you more sales as people like the words “free shipping!”

You decide how soon you’ll ship it.

Total earnings via Mercari in 9 months: $65
Cons for selling on Mercari:

You can’t market your closet whenever you want to.

You have to wait for people to discover you.

There’s no real customer service; if you don’t like an item or if it’s taking a while for your money to come through, you’re stuck for the most part trying to talk it out with the buyer.

They started taking out a seller fee; they didn’t used to do that.

They only direct deposit your earnings on Mondays.

The customers are in the market for a serious deal, so you have to price items at $10 or less to have a fighting chance at a sale.

Pros for shopping on Mercari:

The search engine works well.

You can buy a variety of items from just one seller which can also lend itself to a deal.

You can negotiate via the comments section.

Cons for shopping on Mercari:

It can be overwhelming to know where to start.

The sellers are not always responsive to questions (not sure that the notification settings are up to par).

Again there’s no real customer service, so if you don’t like an item, it can make returns difficult.

The short of it is, Poshmark is the better place to buy and sell. I started using Mercari when they weren’t taking out a seller’s fee. Now I just have clothes there in case someone sees them there that isn’t on Poshmark. I enjoyed using earnings from Mercari to buy things like essential oils (you can’t find random stuff like that on Posh). Next on my list to try is EBay!

Have you done any online shopping? What’s your favorite place to go?

PS: if you’re going to try your hand in Mercari, you can use this code to get $2 off: ZDSRWG. If you want to check out Poshmark, use this code to get $5 off your first purchase: JXAXJ. (BTW, I get the same amount of credit as you do when you use these codes.)

PPS: I wish I knew how many hours it has taken me to get these earnings; I just know that it was A LOT of time!

6 Money-Making Ideas for the Entire Family

I am very fortunate to have parents who know the immeasurable value in teaching children at a young age to work hard and to earn what they want. I once wanted a very expensive baby doll, and my parents agreed that they would pay half if I would earn the other half.  At the age of seven, with a burning desire for that new doll, I would have done just about anything. My parents had me pick cherry tomatoes in the backyard for $.10 each tomato. Little did they know this was such an enjoyable job for me! I not only learned how to work, but I also learned how tomatoes should look before they get picked.  Come Christmas, I was $1 short on my half of the bargain, but my parents, seeing I had learned my lesson, got me that doll for Christmas. I still remember the joy I had running up and down the hallway with that baby in tow, knowing I had done my part. That doll’s name is Jennifer, and she is a treasured reminder of the precious gift of hard work.

Teaching children to work is a priceless gift, not a punishment. I am grateful beyond words that my parents knew and taught the principle of working hard to earn what you want as it’s come to my aid in massive ways. The entitlement mentality that many live by is robbing them of the joy and contentment that hard work brings.

I understand that not everyone has the luxury of paying his or her children to do chores around the house (especially when their “toys” start becoming more expensive). This is absolutely not the only method of teaching your children to work for what they want. The possibilities are endless, but here are some ideas to get you started:

Garage/yard sale – Have them contribute some of their own items, help price items or set out the items on the day of, or hold signs to point people to your sale.

Bake sale – Have them help you measure or package or advertise. You could even add these baked goods to the list of items to sell at your garage sale! (Tip: I suggest incorporating popcorn: most people love it, and it’s so cheap when made from scratch!)

Lemonade/hot chocolate stand – I was so excited as an 8 year old to make $10 from this! I don’t remember having much help from my parents on this one, but I probably did! I’m sure it depends on your children’s ages.

Neighborhood car wash (or at a business)This is a great time to teach them how to wash a car, and most people are just so impressed that kids are learning to work that they don’t notice that their tires aren’t perfectly cleaned.

Candy bar selling door to door – This was my JAM! If you don’t have a Costco or Sam’s membership, ask a friend who does have a membership to buy a couple boxes of chocolate candy bars for you and head on out to sell those babies! By the way, the younger children can do really well with this if you’ll but teach them to do the asking!

Taco/Burger/sandwich stand – I would opt for an easy lemonade stand, but with all these food trucks becoming the rage, I say why not give it a try?! You may have a chef in the making!

Not all of these will work for every family, (and I tried to stick to only family-oriented ideas, not individual “fundraising” like card marking, lawn mowing, etc.), but I’m certain that if you’re committed to teaching your children to work, you’ll find a way to show them how to earn money. These ideas may not be your ideal way of teaching them or your ideal way of making some extra income, but maybe it will be the start of something beneficial for your family.

How about you? What are some ways you’ve tried to teach your children to work? Are there any ideas you could add to the list?

Photo credit: Clem Onojeghou

Quote: Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. —Chinese proverb