20 Items to Remember to Budget!

Ever built a budget for the month and realized later that you forgot about something so obvious? Been there! If you’re like me, you had an extensive meeting with your spouse to make sure every detail was cared for, but yet something came up that you probably should’ve expected and should’ve discussed in that “extensive meeting” and just didn’t.

Well here’s a list of basic things to be sure to add to your budget so you can build your best budget possible. It works for our family of 2, but I think it will be a decent guideline for any size of family (food is still food and bills are still bills, right?). I’ll start with the obvious and move to the less common.

Side note 1: we use a free app called Every Dollar for our budget, and we love it!!

Side note 2: get out your calendar for the month so you have an idea of the extra items like birthdays you’ll be spending money on!

Side note 3: for extra tips on saving money on your bills, check this out!

Here we go! (and if you use Every Dollar, you can choose to have your budget copied from last month, create an entirely new one, or edit your last month’s budget for the coming month…so no need to remember these items each time!)

1. Mortgage/rent

2. Food – groceries and restaurants (will you be having company at all this month?)

3. Gasoline

4. Electricity/gas

5. Water/garbage

6. Phone bill

7. Car insurance

8. Car maintenance/savings for car maintenance

9. Clothing – dry cleaning or needed items

10. Entertainment (Don’t forget your friends asked you to go to that show with them!)

11. Gifts (Whose birthday or baby shower is coming up?)

12. Emergency fund (for a flat tire, sudden death in the family, etc; $1,000 is a good goal for this!)

13. Savings

  • Short term funds (for things like computers and vacations that need more than one month’s budget to purchase)
  • Long term savings (for a house, a new car, bigger emergencies; Dave Ramsey suggest saving 3-6 months worth of income for the bigger unexpected things)
  • Retirement (don’t rely only on the government, please!)

14. Life insurance

15. Health/health insurance

16. Travel

17. Home maintenance

18. Homeowners/Renters insurance

19. Education

20. Miscellaneous

Bet you didn’t think the list could be so long for “basics!” Let me know if I missed something!

Photo credit: Pictures of Money | Cropped

10 Things Frugal People Do (Part 2)

Frugal people do things differently. Plain and simple. And regardless of where you stand on the frugality scale, you can incorporate changes today to save you a lot of money (and even stress) in the future!

If you missed part 1, you can check it out here.

Cut the unnecessary. In our modern world, we are bound to fill up our lives with unnecessary expenses from time to time! Do you use your gym membership? You could easily run around the neighborhood for free or do an at-home fitness video. Do you need your cable TV if you also have Netflix? Do you read all the magazines you pay for, and do you eat all your produce before it goes bad? Think of the ways you can cut out the unnecessary; once you start thinking, you’re sure to come up with something.

Use everything you have. I recently wanted to do some crafting, but I didn’t want to spend any money on any part of the craft. I had some burlap my mom gave me, and I had some cardboard from Aldi, so I made a cute, J-shaped door hanger. When you start thinking of using only what you have in your home, I bet you’ll surprise yourself with how creative and inventive you are. This is also how I stopped buying paper towels in exchange for other household items.

Find ways to make money. Recycle, do side work, sell unused and unwanted items online or locally, sell clothes online (I’ve used Poshmark and Mercari, and they’re both good for different reasons). I’ve taken my juicer to work, along with some produce, and set up shop on my lunch break, making juices for coworkers; of course I also set out a tip jar (just make sure you’re following your company’s protocol for this!).

Take care of what you have. Clean your vacuum cleaner when it’s time, not waiting until the belt is broken from overload or the filter is irreplaceable. My husband’s expensive Colehaan shoes have to be resoled and polished regularly, and using a shoehorn is best because it helps absorb sweat and keep a good shape. Resoling and polishing and shoehorns all cost money, but those costs are better than a new pair of expensive shoes! Bottom line: If you need it or if it means something to you, take the time and money to take care of it. Usually the maintenance is cheaper than the replacement piece, and it’s almost always cheaper than replacing it altogether!

Don’t turn down help when it’s offered. It’s amazing to me how God has always given us wonderful friends who love to help us. We have a beautiful kitchen table, thanks to some very wonderful friends. We have a nice 6 foot Christmas tree, thanks to some other very wonderful friends. When you live in a way that is “unlavish,” often your friends or family notice without your saying a word. And they usually want you to enjoy nice things, especially if it’s in their power to help. So if they offer, let them! If they are asking if you want to take home left-overs from an event, say “yes!” (This does not mean to go around, sounding like an impoverished soul that needs some help, in hopes that someone will feel sorry enough for you to offer to have you over for dinner or something!)

Do you consider yourself frugal? Is there a tip or two you can incorporate today? Do you have tips to add? Let me know what you think of the list! If you missed part 1, check it out here!

Photo credit: Ken Teegardin | Cropped

5 Foundational Money Saving Tips

Saving $1,000 may seem impossible. Just when you start saving money, something breaks.  And don’t get me wrong, it happens. Life happens. Stuff really does come up that you HAVE to tend to. You can’t drive around with a flat tire.

Sometimes that “have to” is imagined though. Friends drop in; you don’t “have to” feed them an elaborate meal outside your means (that’s a “want to”…impress). Here are five basic tips that have helped us save money lately:

Define necessities. We are spending only what is truly necessary. Defining those necessities can get tough, particularly if you’re married because of those “seemingly-pesky differing opinions.” Even within the realm of food – a basic necessity – we differ in opinions. Personally, I don’t think it’s wise to cut produce from our groceries. My husband, however, can get so into our “strict rice diet,” that produce is cut quite easily. Anyway, opinions differ. It’s important to define true necessities (and agree on them if you’re married).

Create a budget. To fail to plan is to plan to fail. A defined budget means you tell your money where to go instead of wondering where it went. For starters, try a journal or Excel. My favorite is a free mobile app, Every Dollar. If you aim for nothing, you’re sure to make it. Why not at least try? You have nothing to lose and much to gain, so start your free budget today!

Live within your means. If you’re living by a budget, you’re living within your means, right? Not necessarily. You can definitely have a budget and not stick to it. And you can absolutely still be using a credit card. Only buy what you can truly afford. If that means telling friends that you can’t go to their fun event, so be it. Live within your means.

Be realistic. You know you have a required meeting that’s 50 miles round trip, so plan your gas money accordingly. You can’t think, “I’ll just make it work,” and then run out of gas before the month’s end. For me, I have to be realistic about how much produce we’ll actually eat in a week. 🙂

Enjoy the simple things. If you’re truly living within your means, you may have to adjust your lifestyle a bit. But boy is it less stressful! Here’s my list of ways to enjoy the simple (and free) life.

Can you implement one of these today? If you’re married, talk to your spouse about what you can work on together. It’s amazing how fast money adds up…either in your savings or on your credit card. What can you do today to make a better financial future?

*A note to those in debt: these small steps matter (just see Dave Ramsey in his Total Money Makeover). However much debt you have, you can beat it! Promise. But every day you wait, it’s only getting worse. So what are you waiting for? Start today!

Photo credit: Frankieleon | Cropped